The question of migrating from one country to another is one that is both important and one that has jurisprudential implications upon the migrant. The concept of migration is not just a geographical one, so this booklet is not only intended for those who wish to travel from Islamic countries to non-Islamic countries – but can also apply to those who wish to do the opposite, or to stay with in either.

The questions of who should migrate? Where should we migrate to? How long to stay there? What happens when a reason to migrate is lifted? Can spouses have different obligations with regards to migrating? What about mature children and their obligations if the parents migrate? Does financial status have an impact? And are these answers different to scholars who migrate to preach?

Ayahs of the Holy Qur’an, traditions, what classic and modern scholars have to say on the issue will be presented to the reader so that they can make their own decisions based on the information provided and their own personal circumstance.

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Sheikh Zuhair Al-Durura: [ARABIC] The terms are explained. The one who knows that migrating to the west will damage his religion or that of his religion will render such a move prohibited. The one who moved his family to such a place where he can not educate himself and his family religiously in an appropriate manner will bear the whole responsibility of those who went astray generation after generation.

Sheikh Habib Al-Kadhimy: [ARABIC] Every so often questions arise about migrating to other countries, other continents etc. How expensive is the choice to migrate! And if this migration results in “taa’rub”, it then results in the children and grandchildren to be raised in a corrupt environment. And to Judgement Day, these generations will grow in number…

Syed Sabah Shubbar: [ARABIC] Some scholars have identified this term “Taarub after migration” phrase as going to a place where religion can not be practiced or that  religion is affected detrimentally over time.

Many people who want to migrate to such placed start by taking off part of their wives hijab, or shaving the beard, even before they actually move, as examples. Then over there, slowly and over time, the neighbors start to visit, they go to work functions etc and they start shaking hands with the opposite gender using the excuse of severe embarrassment… So over time, this move has had a negative effect…

To move to such a place is not permissible. Even if one is there and nothing has happened yet – but there is this feeling that something may be starting to change or that there is a potential for it – it is obligatory upon this person to leave that place!

Sheikh Jaa’far Al-Abd Kareem: [ARABIC] Major Sins – “Taa’rub after Migration”. People may wish to move to places, within the same country or to another nation, that have no religion or polytheists, and this mixing with these people, and the children mixing with them, may result in many religious issues to be forgotten or become weaker over time. This is one of the Major Sins.

The children may grow up to say – yes, my father was a Shia but I am….

Or theologies and practices that change in line with the environment in which you have moved to, especially for children.

In narrations, says that Taa’rub after migration and polytheism are one! Why – because this move leads to polytheism.

Sheikh Al-Ghazi: [ARABIC] (The entire clip is relevant however this is a summary from minute 5:45) – As some one who has behind the scenes access to the secrets of families through counselling sessions, either for advice or jurisprudence, so they tell me their secrets. And the end result is that it is very difficult to raise children even to the extent of 5%. Because the problem that exists is the general environment! How people live. And especially in the religious environments, there is no such similarity in non Islamic countries. So it is important take a second look at the issue of migration…

Dr. Mohammad Khair Al-Shua’al [ARABIC]: What is the ruling on the issue of taking a permanent residency, or something similar to that, in a non-Islamic country:

Summary of answers:
Al-Maliki and Ibn Hazm Al-Zahiri – have forbidden it regardless of fear of sin or otherwise.
Hanafi, Shaf-e, Hanbali – It is allowable if they are able to show and protect their own religeon and themselves and have protection.

All, however, agree, that one who is not able to protect their faith where they are is forbidden to stay there and is obligated to escape to where they can protect themselves and their faith.